3 Steps To Surviving A Tornado In Delaware

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“A seemingly normal night takes a turn for the worse as a devastating tornado bears down on an unsuspecting family.”

A father uses his body as a shield to protect his family while a tornado tears apart their house. A group makes the decision to wait out the tornado in their minivan while debris whips all around them. A seemingly normal night takes a turn for the worse as a devastating tornado bears down on an unsuspecting family.

These are just some of the nightmares of surviving a Tornado. With bad weather, all it really takes is a little common sense. To increase your chances of survival when bad weather strikes, a little planning and practice is all it takes, because being prepared could mean life or death.

In 2015 a Tornado was confirmed in New Castle, where it touched down on New castle Avenue. Witnesses reported seeing a funnel cloud around 7:45 p.m., said the New Castle County Office of Emergency Management. The cloud hovered about 25 to 30 feet off the ground. The EF-0 twister produced winds of 65 mph. The tornado and surrounding storm caused a roof to collapse on an apartment building, snapped utility poles, brought down wires and left about 3,700 of structures without power.

So, do you think you have what it takes to survive a Tornado? It is often said that tornadoes are nature’s most violent storms, and for good reason. Not only do tornadoes carry strong and damaging winds in excess to 300 mph, but they are also accompanied by lightening, heavy rains, flash floods, and hail. When a tornado strikes, every choice you make at every moment can mean the difference between life and death.

The first step to protecting yourself and family from a tornado is to seek shelter. At first sign of a tornado or a tornado warning, you should stop whatever you’re doing and immediately seek shelter even if you don’t see a tornado. Why? because a Tornado Warning means that a Tornado has actually been sighted.

Knowing the difference between a Tornado Warning as opposed to a tornado Watch is very important in Tornado preparedness Planning because.


1. Seek Appropriate Shelter

An underground tornado shelter or a specially designed safe room is the best two places to be during a tornado. Some homes, businesses, and schools usually have tornado shelters. However, if they don’t, go to the basement of a building, and stay away from windows. Cover yourself with mattresses, cushions, or sleeping bags. To protect yourself from falling debris, get under heavy furniture if possible.

If you’re unable to go to a basement or tornado shelter, go to the lowest floor level in a room that is located near the center of the house with no windows or go to a hallway with no windows or under a stairwell. Bathrooms are known to be particularly safe because they are fortified by pipes and you can “Stay out of elevators, as you could be trapped in them if power is lost. Instead, use the stairs to descend to the lowest floor.”


2. Remain in Your Shelter

Always stay in your shelter until the tornado has passed. If possible, listen for advisories from the National Weather Service or on local radio or TV. Keep in mind that multiple tornadoes often form in an area, and it may not be safe to leave your shelter even after one tornado has passed.


3. Exit With Caution

After a tornado strikes, you are likely to encounter hazards such as flooding, falling debris, collapsing buildings, and blocked roads. Avoid fallen power lines and puddles with wires in them, and avoid using matches or lighters in case of natural gas or fuel tank leaks. Be alert and proceed with caution, as there may be sharp objects scattered about the ground. Do not enter damaged buildings under any circumstances, as they may be prone to collapse.


For more information about how to prepare for natural disasters such as Tornadoes, visit the Delaware Prepare website.

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